Home Sms code Top 20 Most Spoofed Fraudulent Companies Are Delivery Service Providers

Top 20 Most Spoofed Fraudulent Companies Are Delivery Service Providers

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Analysts have revealed the TOP 20 brands most used in SMS scams by fraudsters, to scam people across the UK – and delivery services are number one!

With more and more people relying on online technologies, and with Christmas just around the corner, there has been a unique opportunity for scammers to impersonate brands that connect with customers at using text messages.

Card machine supplier, Dojo, looked at the number of Google searches for SMS scams linked to well-known brands to see what the UK trends are currently.

For example, ‘Royal Mail text scam’ search queries were analyzed, revealing that the percentage increase year over year was incredibly higher. With this in mind, the experts at Dojo also provided 5 top tips on how to spot smishing text.

A shocking 7 of the 20 most frequently spoofed companies are delivery service providers – Royal Mail taking the top spot!

Ranking

Company Name

Average Google search volumes per month in UK

% research increase (12 months) UK

1

Royal courier

30,200

9.400%

2

Hermes

12,500

1,606%

3

Pay Pal

8,300

-87%

4

Halifax

6000

-70%

5

DPD

4,900

24.100%

6

DHL

3,800

243%

7

Santander

1,470

929%

8

UPS

1,300

181%

9

Barclays

1180

86%

ten

DVLA

980

-56%

11

Amazon

650

0%

12

Parcelforce

490

400%

13

Apple Pay

310

1,300%

14

Blank media

260

-55%

15

Uber

250

357%

16

Tesco

220

22%

17

Gov.uk

200

100%

18

Boots

90

100%

19

Sky

50

200%

20

Dominoes

30

100%

Royal Mail is the MOST impersonated in SMS smishing scams

Hermes is in second place, just behind Royal Mail, with 12,500 searches per month by UK residents.

Another delivery service, DPD, follows closely in fifth place for the most smishing SMS scams and performs more than 4,900 searches per month.

DPD in particular saw the largest search increase of 24.100% in the past 12 months, with many scammers attempting to impersonate the company to retrieve details of unsuspecting customers.

1. Christmas SMS scams: how to spot a smishing text message

While customers are getting smarter about texting, scammers are getting more advanced and their scam emails aren’t always so easy to spot.

Naveed Islam, Head of Information Security at Dojo put together five tips for spotting a smishing text message:

“Criminals are getting more creative with their deception. Due to the lockdown and resulting Main Street closure, people’s buying habits have shifted online. “

“It’s no surprise that we have seen an increase in the number of criminals exploiting this change in behavior with fake package delivery scams.”

“For a lot of people, these frauds are incredibly convincing and traumatic. “

“This increase is monitored and managed by the dedicated UK Police team, Action fraud. “

“But in the short term, there are ways for consumers to protect themselves and minimize their risk of digital fraud.”

“We have outlined some tips for people who receive fake text messages below”:

2. Check if you expected a message from this company

Always check your last correspondence with the company and contact them if you are not expecting any messages. Whether you are not sure or are totally convinced that you received a fraudulent text message claiming to be a business, contact that business to let them know and get more information.

Use the official websites of the delivery companies to track your package. We have listed the official websites of the major delivery companies below.

DHL Рtrack a package, Royal Mail Рtrack your article, DPD Рtracking service, Herm̬s Рtrack your package, Yodel Рpackage tracking, UPS Рtrack a package

3. Make sure you have signed up to receive SMS from this company

When you sign up with a business, they will always ask for your permission to receive SMS messages from them. So, before clicking on a link in a suspected fraudulent text message, always check this first.

Whether it’s clicking on a suspicious link or providing your personal details, you should take the time to review the text and research its legitimacy before taking any action.

If you’ve already clicked on the link, immediately check the URL and don’t log in anywhere as crooks can capture your details to take control of your account.

4. Make sure the text is from a number you recognize – search for the number on Google before opening

Scammers can spoof phone numbers pretending to be from your area code, or even a number you know, so always google the number if the text you receive is suspicious in any way.

In a fraudulent text message, their goal is often to convince you to click on a link. Scammers thrive by creating a sense of urgency and panic in the recipient. They will use scary tactics or threatening language to get you to do something.

Check spelling and grammar, or errors in the company name

While some scam texts are very sophisticated, many of them can be poorly worded and there are telltale signs that they are not legitimate.

5. Never enter sensitive data from SMS messaging links

If you think you have received a smishing text message, do not click on the link at all. Scammers often include malicious links and once opened they allow them access to anything on your phone.

If you accidentally click on the link in your text, do not provide your private information (username, password, payment card information) to this website.

If you accidentally click on the link and provide private information, you should immediately change your passwords and immediately alert your bank that issued the payment card.

Keep checking your bank accounts regularly to make sure no money is missing. It is always best to be careful and vigilant when it comes to online security.

Telephone operators allow you to report suspicious SMS messages for free using the 7726 shortcode.

If you upload a text, your provider can investigate the origin of the text and take action if it turns out to be malicious. For more information and advice on online fraud, visit Action Fraude official website.

Did you spot something? Do you have a story? Send a Facebook message | A direct message on Twitter | Email: [email protected]


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